Participants

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Linda Burman-Hall

Linda Burman-Hall


Linda Burman-Hall’s teaching and research revolves around performance practices and improvisation in selected Western and non-Western musics. She is active not only as a musicologist-performer specializing in Baroque and classical literature for early keyboards, but also as an ethnomusicologist of Euro-American and Indonesian traditional musics. She is interested in relating regional styles and fashions in music to their cultural context and in describing and performing appropriate realizations of musical materials. Well-known as Artistic Director of Santa Cruz Baroque Festival, Linda Burman-Hall regularly performs a wide range of music, from works of the medieval mystic Hildegard of Bingen to world premieres of multi-cultural, experimental and computer music. Some published and forthcoming CDs feature Turkish, Celtic, German, French, Chinese, Japanese and Indonesian traditional music instruments or repertoires. Dr. Burman-Hall has published articles about African pianism. Her activities in South Asia include directing the UCSC Endowments in North Indian Music for several years, and in 2010-2012, she co-directed the Creative-Work Fund’s project ‘Raga & Raj: Imaginary Intersections with composer Barry Phillips for East-meets-West, Ravi Shankar’s personal label devoted to intercultural crossover project. Her most recent project is a video and audio collage project focusing on the endangered endemic primates and other wildlife of the Mentawai Archipelago, west of Sumatra, Mentawai: Listening to the Rainforest. She is currently Professor of Music at UC Santa Cruz, where she teaches Balinese gamelan, Southeast Asian music, history, theory and early music.

Jugdep Chima

Jugdep Chima


Jugdep S. Chima is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Hiram College (Ohio, USA). He was previously a Lecturer of Political Science at the University of California–Berkeley, and Associate Editor for South Asia with the peer-reviewed academic journal Asian Survey. His published research deals with various aspects of comparative ethnonationalism, South Asian politics, and international relations. Jugdep was born and raised in California. He holds a B.A. degree in political science from the University of California–Berkeley and a Ph.D. in the same field from the University of Missouri–Columbia.

James Clifford

James Clifford


James Clifford taught in UCSC’s History of Consciousness Department for 33 years and was founding director of the Center for Cultural Studies. He is best known for his historical and literary critiques of anthropological representation, travel writing, and museum practices. Clifford co-edited (with George Marcus) the controversial intervention, Writing Culture, the Poetics and Politics of Ethnography (1986). Clifford is currently completing Returns, a book about indigenous cultural politics that will be the third in a trilogy. The widely influential first volume, The Predicament of Culture (1988) juxtaposed essays on 20th-century ethnography, literature, and art. The second, Routes: Travel and Translation in the Late 20th Century (1997) explored the dialectics of dwelling and traveling in post-modernity. The three books are inventive combinations of analytic scholarship, meditative essays, and poetic experimentation.

Ben Crow

Ben Crow


Ben Crow is a Sociology Professor and Chair of the Department of Sociology at UC Santa Cruz. He has written two books on South Asia: Sharing the Ganges: the politics and technology of river development (1995), examines the history and technical and political dimensions of discussions about sharing and harnessing two major rivers of South Asia, the Ganges and the Brahmaputra. His second book, Markets, Class and Social Change: Trading Networks and Poverty in South Asia (2001), explores the emergence of local markets in rice and finance in Bangladesh and their implications for social differentiation. Crow was also contributor to a series of BBC Open University television programs on the Green Revolution in India, contrasting the Punjab and Bihar. His current research focuses on access to water in low income communities, particularly in East Africa.

Nathaniel Deutsch

Nathaniel Deutsch


Nathaniel Deutsch is a professor of History at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where he holds the Neufeld-Levin Endowed Chair in Holocaust Studies and is the Co-Director of the Center for Jewish Studies and the Director of the Humanities Research Institute. He also serves as the Chair of the University of California Humanities Network. Deutsch is the author of five books, including most recently The Jewish Dark Continent: Life and Death in the Russian Pale of Settlement, (Harvard University Press, 2011) for which he received a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Van Dusenbery

Van Dusenbery


Verne A. (“Van”) Dusenbery is Professor of Anthropology and Chair of the Global Studies Program at Hamline University in Saint Paul, Minnesota. His recent books include, Sikh Diaspora Philanthropy in Punjab: Global Giving for Local Good (New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2009), co-edited with Darshan S. Tatla, and Sikhs at Large: Religion, Culture, and Politics in Global Perspective (New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2008), a collection of essays.

Narinder Singh Kapany

Narinder Singh Kapany


A graduate of the Agra University in India, Narinder Singh Kapany completed advanced studies in optics at the Imperial College of Science & Technology, London and received his PhD from the University of London in 1955. His career has spanned science, entrepreneurship and management, academia, publishing, lecturing and farming. As a scientist, Dr. Kapany is widely acknowledged as “the father of fiber optics “which has changed the world in multifarious ways. He has over 100 patents and has received many awards including the “Fiat Lux Award” from the UC Santa Cruz Foundation in 2008. He has published over 100 scientific papers and four books on opto-electronics & entrepreneurship.

His personal interests include philanthropy, art collecting, and sculpting. He has endowed a chair of Sikh Studies the University of California, Santa Barbara and a chair each in Opto-Electronics & Entrepreneurship at UC Santa Cruz. In the arts he has established a gallery of Sikh Arts at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco and is the founding chairman of the Sikh Foundation and its activities for 45 years. As an artist, Dr. Kapany has created forty ‘dynoptic’ sculptures.
He lives in the Bay Area with his wife Satinder.

Inderjit N. Kaur

Inderjit N. Kaur


Inderjit Nilu Kaur is a musicologist specializing in Sikh Shabad Kirtan, the music of Punjab, and of South Asia. Her work over the last several years has focused on the history, transmission, form, aesthetics, and performance of Sikh Shabad Kirtan, and its distinctive features in relation to Indian classical and popular music. She has presented her research at conferences and seminars, and given lectures, at universities including Oxford University, UC Berkeley, UC Santa Barbara, UC Riverside, UC Santa Cruz, San Jose State University, and Hofstra University. She has published papers in journals such as Journal of Punjab Studies and Sikh Formations, and magazines such as Nishaan. Along with research, Inderjit has been actively engaged in community service through educational and documentation programs in the Bay Area Sikh community. Her documentation work includes the production, in 2006, of a DVD of a live performance of historical compositions by renowned 11th generation rāgi, (late) Bhai Avtar Singh. At his request, in 2005-6, she translated into English the text of his four-volume (forthcoming) book on historical compositions. Inderjit is trained in Indian classical music, and grew up singing rāg-based Sikh Shabad Kirtan. She holds a PhD in Economics from UC Berkeley, and after many years of teaching and research in economics, alongside her research on Sikh Shabad Kirtan, she is now devoted full-time to musicology.

Supreet Kaur

Supreet Kaur


Supreet Kaur studies poverty in developing countries, with a particular focus on applying behavioral economics to understand labor markets. She teaches development economics and program evaluation.

Supreet has been selected as a David A. Wells Prize recipient by the Harvard Economics Department (2012); a Giorgio Ruffolo Doctoral Fellow in Sustainability Science at Harvard’s Center for International Development (2010-2011); a Dissertation Fellow at the Project on Justice, Welfare, and Economics at Harvard (2010-2011); and a Public Policy and International Affairs Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School (2005-2007). Her work has received financial support from the National Science Foundation, the Institute for Financial Management and Research in India, and various institutes at Harvard and Columbia universities. She also serves on the National Advisory Board for the Sikh Coalition.

Supreet holds a Ph.D. in Political Economy and Government from the Harvard Economics Department, an M.P.A. in International Development (MPA/ID) from the Harvard Kennedy School, and a B.S. in Operations Research from Columbia University.

Ronnie-Lipschutz

Ronnie D. Lipschutz


Ronnie D. Lipschutz is Professor of Politics and Provost of College Eight at the University of California, Santa Cruz. During Fall term 2011, he was a Velux Visiting Professor in the Department of Business and Politics at the Copenhagen Business School. He was a visiting Professor of Politics and International Relations at Royal Holloway, University of London during 2009-10, and a Visiting Professor and Fellow in the Department of International Relations and Politics during 2002. Lipschutz received his Ph.D. in Energy and Resources from UC-Berkeley in 1987 and an SM in Physics from MIT in 1978. He has been a faculty member at UCSC since 1990.

Lipschutz conducts research in and writes on a range of topics related to global political economy, including U.S. global economic and military policy and strategy, changing conceptions and practices of security, changing forms of war, global governance, global civil society and corporate social responsibility, environmental politics, energy and resources, sustainability and political economy and popular culture. His most recent books are Political Economy, Capitalism and Popular Culture (Rowman & Littlefield, 2010), The Constitution of Imperium (Paradigm, 2008) and Globalization, Governmentality and Global Politics: Regulation for the Rest of Us? (Routledge, 2005) as well as a text co-authored with Mary Ann Tétreault, Global Politics as if People Mattered (Rowman and Littlefield, 2009, 2nd ed.). He is editor of Civil Societies and Social Movements (Ashgate, 2006) and co-editor (with K. Ravi Raman) Corporate Social Responsibility: Comparative Critiques (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010) and (with Gabriela Kütting) of Global Environmental Governance—Power and Knowledge in a Local-Global World (Routledge, 2009). He is also author of, among other volumes, Global Environmental Politics: Power, Perspectives and Practice (Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2004), After Authority—War, Peace and Global Politics in the 21st Century (Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 2000) Cold War Fantasies—Film, Fiction and Foreign Policy (Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 2001) and Global Civil Society and Global Environmental Politics (SUNY Press, 1996), and editor or co-editor of several other books.

Upmanu Lall

Upmanu Lall


Upmanu Lall is a leading expert on hydroclimatology, climate change adaptation, risk analysis and mitigation. His research has emphasized hydrology, water resource systems analysis, operations research and stochastic processes with applications to flood/drought risk and uncertainty assessment and the design and operation of water systems. He has pioneered the application of techniques from (a) nonlinear dynamical systems, (b) nonparametric methods of function estimation and their application to spatio-temporal dynamical systems, and (c) the study of multi-scale climate variability and change as an integral component of hydrologic systems. As new knowledge was created in these areas, he has focused on its application to water resources management through innovation in adaptive or dynamic risk management methods that can use information on the structure of climate for simulation or forecasting. Recently, he has become concerned with the issue of global and regional water sustainability, and the more general issue of modeling and managing planetary change due to coupled human and natural dynamics. He is developing technical and policy tools for the projection and management of environmental change as part of a quantitative approach to sustainability of earth systems.

Gurinder Singh Mann

Gurinder Singh Mann


Gurinder Singh Mann is Professor of Sikh Studies and Director of Center for Sikh and Punjab Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His teaching and research interests focus on Sikhism, Punjabi language, and religion and society in the Punjab. His publications include The Goindval Pothis (Harvard Oriental Series 51, 1997); The Making of Sikh Scripture (Oxford University Press, 2001); and Sikhism (Religions of the World Series, Prentice Hall, 2004). He has coauthored Buddhists, Hindus, and Sikhs of America (Oxford University Press, 2001), and Introduction to Punjabi (Punjabi University, 2011). His current projects include a series of translations of early Sikh texts, and making the teaching of Punjabi available on the internet.

Mandeep Sethi

Mandeep Sethi
Photo by Odell Hussey Photography


Mandeep Sethi is a California grown emcee and youth worker, as well as an active contributor to India’s blooming hip-hop scene. Originally from Los Angeles, Mandeep has shown and proven his ability to rhyme and freestyle with the illest. Mandeep’s primary focus is to educate the youth about the circumstances in which we are living in while resonating ancient indigenous cultures within them, revealing the gods in all of us. Sethi utilizes music and film as his tools of expression, enabling himself as a storyteller of the people.

Mandeep’s most recent accomplishments include becoming the first emcee to appear on Coke Studios @ MTV India with Tabla virtuoso Karsh Kale, releasing his first documentary entitled SIKLIGAR about the original weapons makers of the Sikhs, as well as being featured in the Smithsonian Museum’s upcoming Indian American Heritage Exhibit.

Mandeep is currently working on his next documentary, entitled FOLK LOK, which is sponsored by the American India Foundation and the US Department of State. The project will examine Punjabi folk music traditions and their parallels with Punjabi Hip-Hop Music being created in the region. For more information on Mandeep Sethi, you may visit http://www.mandeepsethi.com

Helen Shapiro

Helen Shapiro


Helen Shapiro is an Associate Professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where she teaches in the departments of Sociology, Latin American and Latino Studies, and Economics. She has also been Provost of Colleges Nine and Ten at UCSC since 2006. She has published widely on Latin American economic development and industrial policy, including Engines of Growth: The State and Transnational Auto Companies in Brazil (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994). She previously taught at the Harvard Business School, and received her Ph.D. in economics from Yale University.

Rajinder Singh Sidhu

Rajinder Singh Sidhu


Rajinder Singh Sidhu’s research and teaching interests cohere around agricultural finance and economics as well as agricultural development, policy, and planning. He has been Principal Investigator of ten international research teams and has published widely. He is currently Professor of Economics and head of the Department of Economics and Sociology at the Punjab Agricultural University in Ludhiana.

Ajit Singh

Ajit Singh


Ajit Singh, Ph.D., is currently a partner at Artiman Ventures where he focuses on early-stage Technology and Life Sciences / Med-Tech investments. On behalf of Artiman, he serves on the Board of Directors of CardioDx Inc., OncoStem Diagnostics Pvt Ltd, and Aditazz Inc. Dr. Singh is also a Consulting Professor in the School of Medicine at Stanford University and is the Lead Director on Board of Directors of Max Healthcare based in New Delhi, India. Prior to joining Artiman, Dr. Singh was the President and CEO of BioImagene (acquired by Roche in 2010), a Digital Pathology company specializing in Cancer Diagnostics. Before BioImagene, Dr. Singh spent nearly twenty years at Siemens in various roles, most recently as the Chief Executive Officer of the Digital Radiology business of Siemens Healthcare, based in Germany. From 2001 to 2006, he was the President and CEO of the Oncology Care Systems Group of Siemens, with global headquarters in Concord, California. Between 1996 and 2001, Dr. Singh held the positions of Group Vice President of Siemens e-Health, and Vice President of Siemens Health Services based in Princeton, NJ, where he led the company’s Healthcare IT business and Consulting Practice. Before transitioning to these business responsibilities, Dr. Singh spent several years in R&D and academia. From 1989 to 1995, he was at Siemens Corporate Research in Princeton, responsible for research in the areas of artificial intelligence, robotics, computer vision, and image analysis. During this time, he concurrently served on the faculty at Princeton University. Dr. Singh holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Columbia University, a master’s degree in Computer Engineering from Syracuse University and a bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering from Banaras Hindu University, India. Dr. Singh is an active speaker in the Life Sciences, Information Technology, and Entrepreneurship communities. He has published two books and numerous refereed articles, and holds five patents.

Harpreet-Singh

Harpreet Singh


Harpreet Singh is a postdoctoral fellow and a member of the faculty in the Department of South Asian Studies at Harvard University. He received his PhD in South Asian Religions from the Committee on the Study of Religion at Harvard in 2012. His dissertation, “Religious Identity and the Vernacularization of Literary Cultures of the Panjab, 1500-1700,” traced the interactions among Sikhs, Muslims and Hindus and the role of religious identity in the articulation of local literary traditions. Singh’s scholarship engages with texts in classical languages such as Persian and Sanskrit, as well as local ones, including Panjabi, Awadhi, Brajbhasha, Hindi, Urdu and Saraiki. His research interests also include the development of religious and ethnic nationalisms in modern South Asia. Before coming to Harvard, Singh was a technologist on Wall Street with training in computer and systems engineering. He left his corporate career to co-found the Sikh Coalition (http://www.sikhcoalition.org)–the largest Sikh civil rights organization in North America–in the wake of hate crimes against Sikhs and Muslims in the aftermath of September 11, 2001 attacks. Singh is a strong advocate of “open access” in higher education and co-founded Academic Room (http://www.academicroom.com), a multidisciplinary knowledge curation platform that is headquartered in the Harvard Innovation Lab and serves scholars from 190 countries.

Inder M. Singh

Inder M. Singh


Dr. Inder M. Singh is the Chairman of Chardi Kalaa Foundation, and has served on the boards of several Sikh non profit organizations including SALDEF and Sikh Foundation. Dr. Singh is the Chairman of LynuxWorks and was CEO until 2006. He founded Excelan, an early leader in local area networks in 1982 and served as its chairman, CEO and president until 1985. Dr. Singh was a co-founder of Kalpana, which pioneered Ethernet switching technology, and one of Cisco’s early acquisitions. He has served on the boards of several high-tech companies. Dr. Singh was Board Chairman and President for the Embedded Linux Consortium. He holds Ph.D. and M.Phil. degrees in computer science from Yale University, and an MSEE from Polytechnic Institute of New York.

Lakhwinder Singh

Lakhwinder Singh


Lakhwinder Singh’s research focuses broadly on development economics, national innovation systems, human development and knowledge economies and area studies (Punjab, India, South Korea, and Asia). He has published two books and numerous articles. His third book, Innovation, Technology and Economic Development: Essays in Memory of Robert Evenson (co-edited with two others) is forthcoming from Routledge. He is currently Professor of Economics at Punjabi University where he is also Coordinator for the Centre for Development Economics and Innovation Studies.

Michael Singh

Michael Singh


Michael Singh was raised in India; he immigrated to the United States when he was 18.

Michael recently completed writing, directing and producing Valentino’s Ghost, a 95-minute documentary film that exposes the way in which U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East, shapes and drives the U.S. media’s portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in the news and popular culture. Valentino’s Ghost premiered in September, 2012, at the Venice Film Festival, where festival director Alberto Barbera called it “a great and very important film.” It played to a packed house and received a standing ovation.

He co-wrote the Hollywood romantic comedy Good Sharma, starring Billy Connolly and Joan Allen, about a NYC cab driver who starts a girls school back in his native village in India. Good Sharma will premiere in the summer of 2014.

Michael wrote, directed and produced The Visionary, about a SoCal trucker/philanthropist from the Punjab. It won “Best Documentary” at the NYC Sikh International Film Festival in 2012.

He wrote, directed and produced The Prisoner’s Song, a 21-minute film about a Sikh WWI POW captured at Flanders by the Germans. It won “Best Film” at Toronto’s Spinning Wheel Film Festival in 2009.

In 1999-2000 he was writer and senior producer of Chicago’s Lifeline, the TV series that launched Discovery’s Health Channel, where he wrote and produced over thirty one-hour documentary films. In 2000 and 2001, the show was awarded the “Best Health Series” prize at the International Health and Medical Media Awards, competing against all the major network shows.

Michael is currently making the documentary film Riding the Tiger, his personal eyewitness account of one of the massacres of Sikhs in New Delhi, India, 1984.

Nirvikar Singh

Nirvikar Singh


Nirvikar Singh’s research and published articles in Sikh and Punjabi Studies have included work on healthcare systems in Punjab, the Punjab economy, comparison of past conflicts in Punjab and Kashmir, Sikh literature as an agent of social change in the early 20th century, and analysis of the fundamental doctrines of Sikhism in historical context. Professor Singh is also one of the leading scholars on India’s political economy, and has researched and published extensively on topics such as federalism, governance, and macroeconomic policies. He is beginning a new research project on Indian American entrepreneurs, which will be extended to look specifically at the experience of Sikh Americans as entrepreneurs.

Pashaura Singh

Pashaura Singh


Pashaura Singh (Ph.D., University of Toronto, Canada) is Professor and Dr. Jasbir Singh Saini Endowed Chair in Sikh and Punjabi Studies at the University of California, Riverside. His teaching and research focus on scriptural studies and early Sikh history. He has a sound knowledge of traditional Sikh learning, manuscripts in archaic forms of Gurmukhi script and Indian religious traditions, with a mastery of contemporary issues in textual studies, canonicity, hermeneutics, literary theory, and history of religions. His publications include The Guru Granth Sahib: Canon, Meaning, and Authority (Oxford University Press/OUP 2000), The Bhagats of the Guru Granth Sahib: Sikh Self-Definition and the Bhagat Bani (OUP 2003), and Life and Work of Guru Arjan: History, Memory, and Biography in the Sikh Tradition (OUP 2006). He has also edited five volumes, the most recent one being Sikhism in Global Context (OUP 2011). Currently, he is working on two research projects: Sacred Melodies: History, Theory and the Performance of Sikh Kirtan and The Oxford Handbook of Sikh Studies (OUP, UK).

Pritam Singh

Pritam Singh


Dr. Pritam Singh has a doctorate in economics from the University of Oxford, and is currently the Director of Studies on the doctoral programme in economic development at Oxford Brookes University, Oxford. He is the author of Economy, Culture and Human Rights: Turbulence in Punjab, India and Beyond (2010), Federalism, Nationalism and Development: India and the Punjab Economy (2008); and has co-edited Punjabi Identity in a Global Context (1999) and Equal Opportunities in the Curriculum (1999). He is on the editorial board of a number of journals including Journal of Punjab Studies, Journal of Indian Politics and World Review of Political Economy. He has been a Visiting Professor at Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi and is on the Executive Committee of the Association of Heterodox Economics and The World Association of Political Economy. He is currently working on spatial shift in global capitalism and its sustainability implications.

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