Research

Winter 2014 Center for Cultural Studies: Colloquium Series

The Center for Cultural Studies hosts a weekly Wednesday colloquium featuring
work by faculty and visitors. The sessions consist of a 40-45 minute presentation followed
by discussion. We gather at noon, with presentations beginning at 12:15 PM. Participants are
encouraged to bring their own lunches; the Center provides coffee, tea, and cookies.

 


 

January 15
Warren Montag

Brown Family Professor of Literature, English Department, Occidental College. Althusser’s Lenin Warren Montag’s research has two foci: French and Italian thought of the 1960s and 1970s, especially Althusser; and Literature and Philosophy of the seventeenth and eighteenth century. His recent book concerns the emergence of a necro-economics from French economic thinkers to Adam Smith (and beyond, from Malthus to Von Mises).

January 22
Rebecca Karl

Professor of Chinese History at New York University. Economics, Culture, and Historical Time: A 1930s Chinese Critique Rebecca Karl’s current work includes a forthcoming book entitled The Magic of Concepts: Philosophy and the Economic in Twentieth Century China; this book examines the intersections between philosophical
and economic questions as they emerge and re-emerge over the course of China’s twentieth century. Ongoing work includes a project on histories of economic concepts in China tentatively entitled,
Worlds of Chinese Economic Thought.

January 29
Mayanthi Fernando

Assistant Professor of Anthropology at UCSC. Improper Intimacies, or the Cunning of Secularism Mayanthi Fernando works on religion, politics, and the secular. Her first book on the Islamic revival and French secularity will be out in 2014. Her new project examines
the nexus of sex, religion, and secularism, and in particular the French state’s regulation of Muslim women’s sexual and religious intimacies.

February 5
Aristea Fotopoulou

Research Fellow, University of Sussex, UK; 2014 Visiting Scholar at the Science and Justice Research Center, UCSC. Platform Openness, Data Sharing and Visions of Democracy Ariestea Fotopoulou works at the intersections of media & cultural studies with science & technologies studies. She has written on digital networks and feminism, information politics, knowledge production, and digital engagement. She currently explores algorithmic living and practices of data sharing.

February 12
Gildas Hamel

Professor of Literature, UCSC. Stretching Time: Emergence of Apocalyptics and Its Uses Gildas Hamel’s current work is on the economy, society and religion of ancient Israel and Graeco-Roman Judaea. His research focuses on taxes, forms of labor, the competition of various groups for resources and political power, and the evolution of religious structures, including the appearance of monotheism and new notions of time.

February 19
Warren Sack

Professor of Film & Digital Media, UCSC. A Machine to Tell Stories: From Propp to Software Studies Warren Sack is currently working on a book entitled The Software Arts (for the Software Studies series at MIT Press) where he explores an understanding of computer science as a liberal art and computer programming as a form of writing.

February 26
Matthew Wolf-Meyer

Associate Professor of Anthropology. Nervous Materialities: Love Robots, Pacified Bulls, Stimoceivers and Spinoza’s Brain Matthew Wolf-Meyer’s work focuses on medicine, science and media in the
United States. He is currently finishing a book manuscript, tentatively titled What Matters: Autism, Neuroscience and the Politics of American Brains, on the alternative histories of American neuroscience, seen through the lens of extreme anti-social forms of autism.

March 5
Karen Bassi

Professor of Literature and Classics, UCSC. Fading into the Future: Visibility and Legibility in Thucydides History Karen Bassi’s recent book, In Search of Lost Things: Classics Between History and Archaeology is a study of visual perception as the source of knowledge about the past in ancient Greek epic, history writing, and drama. The book explores the dominance of vision and visual metaphors in making truth claims, the role of language in distinguishing fiction from fact, and the criteria for establishing the reality of the past.

 


 

ALL COLLOQUIA ARE IN HUMANITIES 210.
The Center for Cultural Studies hosts a weekly Wednesday colloquium featuring
work by faculty and visitors. The sessions consist of a 40-45 minute presentation followed
by discussion. We gather at noon, with presentations beginning at 12:15 PM. Participants are
encouraged to bring their own lunches; the Center provides coffee, tea, and cookies.
WINTER 2 014
(831) 459-3872 / cult@ucsc.edu
http://ccs.ihr.ucsc.edu/

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